Monthly Archives: July 2014

Quote Of The Week

“If someone thinks that peace and love are just a cliche that must have been left behind in the 60’s, that’s a problem. Peace and love are eternal.”
― John Lennon

spacer

This Week In Music (27 July – 2 August)

Songs which reached Number One on the Billboard Hot 100 chart:

In 1964, A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles.

In 1966, Wild Thing by The Troggs

In 1967, Light My Fire by The Doors

In 1971, You’ve Got A Friend by James Taylor

In 1972, Gilbert O’Sullivan’s Alone Again (Naturally).

Other notables:

  • The Little Old Lady (From Pasadena), by Jan & Dean, reached Number 3 in 1964
  • What’s New Pussycat, by Tom Jones, reached Number 3 in 1965
  • I Was Made To Love Her, by Stevie Wonder, reached Number 2 in 1967
  • Stoned Soul Picnic, by The 5th Dimension, reached Number 3 in 1968
  • Yesterday Once More, by the Carpenters, reached Number 2 in 1973
  • Shambala, by Three Dog Night, reached Number 3 in 1973

 

Birthdays:

  • Buddy Guy (born in 1936)
  • Garth Hudson (1937)
  • Paul Anka (1941)
  • Jerry Garcia (1942)
  • Bobbie Gentry (1944)
  • Mike Bloomfield (1944)
  • Jonathan Edwards (1946)
  • Simon Kirke (1949)
  • Tommy Bolin (1951)
  • Robert Cray (1953)

 

Remembrances:

  • Brian Cole (of The Association) passed away in 1972
  • Leroy Holmes (orchestra conductor) – 1986
  • Pete Drake (session steel guitarist) – 1988
  • Les Elgart (trumpeter/bandleader) – 1995
  • Ron Townson (of The 5th Dimension) – 2001
  • Mitch Miller – 2010

 

spacer

Quote Of The Week

“When it comes to human dignity, we cannot make compromises.”

— Angela Merkel, German chancellor

spacer

This Week In Music (20-26 July)

On July 20, 1968, the Rascals’ People Got To Be Free, released on Atlantic 2537, peaked at Number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

On July 22, 1967, All You Need Is Love, by The Beatles, on Capitol 5964, reached the Number 1 spot.

On July 26, 1969, The Archies Sugar, Sugar, released on Calendar 63-1008, reached the Number 1 spot.

Other notables this week:

  • The Monkees’ Pleasant Valley Sunday, peaked at Number 3 on July 22, 1967
  • The O’Jays Back Stabbers, peaked at Number 3 on July 22, 1972
  • Napoleon XIV reached No. 3 on 23 July 1966 with They’re Coming To Take Me Away,Ha-Haaa!
  • Like A Rolling Stone, by Bob Dylan, reached No. 2 on 24 July 1965
  • Johnny Cash’s hit A Boy Named Sue, made it to No. 2 on 26 July 1969.

 

Birthday Wishes:

  • Kim Carnes was born on July 20, 1945
  • George Clinton, of Parliament and Funkadelic, was born on July 22, 1941
  • Don Henley, of The Eagles, was born on July 22, 1947
  • Al Di Meola, jazz fusion guitarist, was born on July 22, 1954
  • David Essex was born on July 23, 1947
  • Blair Thornton, of Bachman-Turner Overdrive, was born on July 23, 1950

 

Remembrances:

  • Long John Baldry died on July 21, 2005
  • Eugene Record, of The Chi-Lites, died on July 22, 2005
  • Joe Beck, jazz-funk musician, died on July 22, 2008

 

 

spacer

On This Day In Music

On this day in 1969, the Winstons’ Color Him Father, released on Metromedia 117, peaked at Number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Also on this day in 1969, Honky Tonk Women, by the Rolling Stones, on London 910, debuted on the charts.  It would eventually reach the coveted Number 1 spot on August 23, and stay there for a full four weeks.

Birthday Wishes:

Vikki Carr (born in 1941)

Commander Cody (born George Frayne in 1944)

Alan Gorrie of Average White Band (born in 1946)

Bernie Leadon of The Eagles (born in 1947)

spacer

On This Day In Music

On this day in 1964, the Four Seasons Rag Doll peaked at Number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart.  It was released on Philips 40211 and stayed in the top spot for two weeks.

Also on this day in 1964, The Girl From Ipanema, by Stan Getz and Astrud Gilberto, released on Verve 10323, peaked at Number 5.

In 1970, Patches, by Clarence Carter, entered the charts.  Released on Atlantic 2748, it would eventually peak at Number 4.

In 1964, The Beatles A Hard Day’s Night, released on Capitol 5222, entered the charts.  It reached Number 1 on August 1, and stayed there for two weeks.

Birthday Wishes:

Brian Auger, born on this day in 1939.  A jazz-rock keyboardist specializing in the Hammond organ, Auger’s career began in the mid 1960’s and continues to this day.

Dion, born Dion DiMucci in 1939.

spacer

On This Day In Music

On this day in 1971, Hamilton, Joe Frank and Reynolds’ Don’t Pull Your Love peaked at Number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart.  It was released on Dunhill 4276.

Also on this day in 1965, Ian Whitcomb’s You Turn Me On, released on Tower 127, peaked at Number 8.

In 1971, Sweet Hitchhiker, by Creedence Clearwater Revival, entered the charts.  Released on Fantasy 665, it would eventually peak at Number 6.

In 1965, the Righteous Brothers’ Unchained Melody, on Philles 129, entered the charts.  It peaked at Number 4.

Birthday Wishes”

Terry “Geezer” Butler of Black Sabbath, born on this day in 1949.

Remembrances:

Chas Chandler died on this day in 1996 of a heart attack.  Chandler, the original bassist for The Animals, discovered Jimi Hendrix and produced his first two albums.

spacer

On This Day In Music

On this day in 1966, Hanky Panky, by Tommy James and The Shondells, reached Number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 Charts.  It was released on Roulette 4686 and would spend two weeks at the coveted top spot.

Also on the day in 1966, the Lovin’ Spoonful’s Summer In The City entered the charts.  Released on Kama Sutra 211, it would eventually reach the Number 1 spot on August 13.

Birthday wishes go out to William Bell, R&B and soul singer, who was born on this day in 1939.  In addition to singing, Bell also wrote a number of songs, including Born Under A Bad Sign, made famous by Albert King and Cream.

spacer

On This Day In Music

On this day in 1972, Cornelius Brothers and Sister Rose’s hit Too Late To Turn Back Now, released on United Artists 50910, peaked at Number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 Charts.

Also on this day in 1972, Elton John’s Rocket Man, on Uni 55328, peaked at Number 6.

On this day in 1967, Cold Sweat, by James Brown and released on King 6110, entered the charts.  It would eventually peak at Number 7.

 

spacer

Quote of the Week

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that.  Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”

– Martin Luther King, Jr.

spacer